How to maintain Mental Hygiene during MBA?

World Mental Health Day

The feeling of excitement and happiness that we got after seeing the shortlist mail for our dream college is something that cannot be told but can only be felt personally. The emotional outburst after long hours of a hectic schedule, late night mock tests, hours of preparation for the Personal Interview questions
as well as the anticipation of waiting for that shortlisting mail for months is something that gives us a different view of achievement. Although we are on cloud nine when we enter the new phase of our lives with the onset of the MBA program, what we tend to overlook is taking care of our Mental Hygiene. Yes,
there is a different portion in our life that is as important as physical hygiene, and that is “Mental Hygiene”. This is the practice of taking care of our own mental health as much as we are characterized to take care of our physical health using different measures.

Choosing MBA with a concrete decision for a long-lasting impact on our career and our lives is a big decision that involves a lot of strength and rational decision making. After we dream of all those campus scenarios that can act as memories years later, and step into our new lives, the first week of induction is something that punches our emotions with the rigorous schedule amidst a pool of students that share the same vision and passion for life while pursuing an MBA. Throughout the struggle to adjust to the hectic schedule by delivering the tasks, we find people with different backgrounds and life stories that often intrigues us to know more of them in depth. The onset of the classes results in heavy loads of presentations, markings, endless assignments, time-bound quizzes, mid-term examinations, end-term examinations as well as student body selections. This gives no space for us to even look at mental health
and take measures to improve it which has drastically fallen at the beginning of the induction. Be it the day when we cried alone in our rooms looking at the laptop screen at the decision of taking MBA while doing the presentation with odd strangers at the starting of the induction process to feeling demotivated
when we are not shortlisted for our favorite company during summer placements, this has tremendously impacted our mental health. As society functions with the thought belief that crying is for the weak and that we should be oiled enough to face rejections and failures in life, we are still hit by the rejections, be it in our favorite student body. We tend to compare our lives and our failures with the success stories of others in the same batch because that has been the social stigma that sticks to generations passing this to
each other. From parents comparing your marks to your cousins or friends to the society taunting in case we are unable to clear the entrance exams, this is a permanent tradition that follows a particular hierarchy. This is something that creates friction in our minds when want to improve our mental health.

The feeling of competitiveness, comparison, the feeling of outcasting others in any task or presentation or interview is something that has been fueled in our minds throughout the process. But what we tend to forget is that everyone is different from the struggles and the investment that they have put in while reaching this place. This impacts not only the self-confidence but also it starts a battle of doubting the self-worth which results in a self question, “Do I even deserve to be here?”. The answer to this question should always be YES. This is the point when we should pause for a moment to breathe and take extreme care by following Mental Hygiene. Taking some time off to boost ourselves so that we are able to deliver quality content and not just burn ourselves is something that should be given utmost importance. The eating habits, which just include rushing to the mess and eating as fast as possible because we have pending tasks should be improved, and eating healthy by enjoying our favorite meal
instantly lights up our mood. The mental hyperactivities that are instilled by hour-long classes and day-long MBA schedule can be amended by having an organized schedule where we can cheat out some time for ourselves and we can do our activity which is our mood lifter, be it talking to our favorite person
or just scrolling through music playlists or dancing our heart out or in fact taking a small nap. This maintains emotional health and helps us in the motivational factor which will act as fuel in the protracted journey of MBA. Indeed taking some time while maintaining the balance of the quality of work that is expected from us and watering the flowers of our mental peace and health to influence Mental Hygiene is something that needs to be preached and practiced.

About the Author

Author Profile Picture

Ayushi Kulthia is currently pursuing MBA from IIM Kashipur from Batch 2021-2023. She is a Finance and Accounting student with 2 years of experience in Content Development and Research. She is also actively engaged in the Media and Public Relations Committee of the college. She is a drama enthusiast and loves exploring life by making memories as she is a part of various social service clubs as well. You can connect with her on LinkedIn.

Journey of the Best-All Rounder – MBA 2019-21

IIM Kashipur is not just an alma mater but a memorable transition phase in my life. My journey can be described as an enchanting process where an undergraduate introvert walking into IIM Kashipur sans experience of the corporate world and the fear of competition in some corner of the heart. Eventually, I became an enthusiastic extrovert MBA Graduate walking out of the campus full of confidence, zeal, and the ardour of competing with anyone, anywhere. I would consider IIM Kashipur as a platform that teaches cogitative knowledge, discipline, pragmatic solutions for complex problems which helped to prepare culturally sensitive, tolerant, ethically, and socially responsible manager in me and changes the view to look at real-life business problems and associates yourself with the society. The stimulus culture teaches you the concept of “self-development” through case studies, group discussions and peer learning sessions, B-school competitions, POR, group projects, sports, clubs, presentation, fun with friends, constant race against time and comfort prepared me for the real fight-the so-called Corporate Life. Indubitably extracurricular activities including clubs and sports were tranquilizers for me. It imparted team building and never give up attitude in me unknowingly. Discussion and tête-à-tête at mess or canteen with your peers not only increases your network (net worth) instead of gets you to introduce a variety of prospects, people, and stories. I am grateful to develop a network with world-class faculty and learning from them. IIM Kashipur also taught me learning is not just from doing but observation can also be a big friend. The talented seniors acted like the best mentor and guide anyone dreamed of. Every team be it a competition, fest, club was one of the best teams I have worked in ever before. This conversation cannot be finished without talking about the lush green campus life of IIM Kashipur in the womb of nature which makes it the best place to live.

About the Author

Hemraj Bairwa is alumnus of IIM Kashipur. He is the best all rounder of MBA 2019-21 Batch. He is currently working as Management Trainee – Logistics and Supply Chain at Tata Steel BSL. He was one of Dare2Compete Top 10 College Champions 2020 from IIM Kashipur and has aced a number of coveted corporate and b-school case study competitions.

You can connect with him on LinkedIn

( We thank the Alumni Relations Committee of IIM Kashipur for serving as a bridge to beget  valuable insights about the journey of becoming a gold medalist from our erudite alumnus. )

Journey of Bronze Medalist – MBA 2019-21

Indeed, I still remember the first sight of the entrance of IIM Kashipur, the glimpses of lush green campus and being lost in the similar-looking hostel blocks on the first day. The thought that I would be an MBA graduate from an IIM was exciting and I was looking forward to it. One month into the program I had realized that this journey is not going to be easy. A lot of lectures, assignments, projects, nights out and networking were involved. Ultimately, the continuous and consistent efforts paid off and helped me achieve the Bronze medal. I am overwhelmed by receiving the medal, but a medal was never the aim. I believe that focusing on the process is more important than expecting the results. I would like to express my gratitude to the professors for helping me in the process. A special thanks to my friends who definitely had a major role to play in the process. Now, I can say with confidence that through various experiences over the past two years I have gained good skills and improved my personality. Finally, one simple piece of advice for the future batches – ‘Focus on what you want in the long term rather than what seems good in the short term’. Wish you all great careers ahead.

About the Author

Kaipa Guru Charan Reddy is alumnus of IIM Kashipur. He is the bronze medalist of MBA 2019-21 Batch. He is currently working as the Senior Analyst at EY-Parthenon. He has also been a business consultant at Decimal Point Analytics and has interned with Larsen and Toubro on a project to evaluate hedging decision of MGO, required for operations of L&T subsidiary. He has also worked as a senior manager at Tata Motors in Sales & Marketing department.

You can connect with him on LinkedIn

( We thank the Alumni Relations Committee of IIM Kashipur for serving as a bridge to beget  valuable insights about the journey of becoming a gold medalist from our erudite alumnus. )

Journey of Gold Medalist – MBA-WX 2018-20

While I was posted at a small village in West Bengal, on a fine evening, my husband called me and said- “I want to do MBA from IIM Kashipur and classes are held at Dehradun, will fly down to Dehradun, will enjoy the chilled weather away from city hustle bustle”. I was taken aback and reaction was like- “Are you insane!! you will fly from Mumbai to Dehradun for enjoying chilled weather, you can do your MBA from Mumbai also”. But he has his own logical reasons and somehow he convinced me to join him in this journey to fulfill my dream to have an MBA from IIM. In the process, my transfer took place from rural village to Mumbai, the city of dreams. Then the journey from Mumbai to Dehradun started. The airports became my second home where I took some rest after office, and airplanes became my study room on weekends especially during exam, the backseat of the car became my bedroom while travelling from Delhi to Dehradun, no matter how hostile the weather is. The travelling in shivering chilling weather and sleepless nights became part of our life on weekends. Then, at Dehradun, green blanket at FRI was so soothing to our tired exhaustive sleepless eyes. During the course, we learnt management and was practically implementing management as well, that credit goes to my husband, Nitesh. I believe “where there is Will, there is Way”. It was the determination and focus that made this exhaustive journey thrilling. Every success has its own recipe, the recipe of my success of becoming Gold Medalist is my late father’s blessings, mother’s support, professors’ guidance and above all my husband, who is my strongest motivation, inspiration and his belief on me make this challenging journey complete with a gold medal.

About the Author

Bithika Karmakar is alumnus of IIM Kashipur. She is the gold medalist of MBA-WX 2018-20 Batch. She is currently working as the Assistant Manager at Punjab National Bank. She is Skilled in Management, Banking, Financial Analysis, Team Management, and Retail Banking. Earlier at Union Bank of India,she has handled operations in the branch, looking after the loan department domain and other regulatory banking affair relating to payment remittance, handling and resolving customer

You can connect with her on LinkedIn

( We thank the Alumni Relations Committee of IIM Kashipur for serving as a bridge to beget  valuable insights about the journey of becoming a gold medalist from our erudite alumnus. )

Journey of the Best All Rounder – PGP 2018-20 batch

Keeping a balance of Academics, Committee work and fun activities is not just something that helps you learn and grow, but it also keeps your rhythm going. When I joined the Placement Committee, a lot of people asked me whether I’ll be able to find time for my academics or other activities. But one of the most important aspects of MBA is probably Time Management and once you do this well, you can do a lot more than just sail through. Enhancing my classroom learnings with active discussions with professors and peers, supplementing it with corporate competitions to utilize the classroom learnings in real world corporate case studies, and networking with corporates in order to foster institute relations with corporates – this is what I found myself doing for majority of my time at IIM Kashipur. But along with all this, spending time with a bunch of my peers – some of whom have turned into my extended family – was also something that got me through these two years and learning from each one of them made me a better person.
While I think each person has to carve their own journey, a suggestion would be to try and explore as much possible – sign up for a subject you think you find challenging but also interesting, take part in as many corporate competitions possible, do your committee work diligently and be a part of at least one to help a little in running the institute. You will always find the support from management and our beloved faculties!
All the best!

About the Author

Chirag Dixit is alumnus of IIM Kashipur. He is the best All-Rounder of PGP Batch 2018-20. He is currently working as Equity Specialist at Bloomberg LP. He specializes in Equity Analytics – client workflows and also has a focus on – BQL (Bloomberg Query Language), Launchpad, Bloomberg for Education (BMC) and MYBB transfers.

You can connect with him on LinkedIn

( We thank the Alumni Relations Committee of IIM Kashipur for serving as a bridge to beget  valuable insights about the journey of becoming a gold medalist from our erudite alumnus. )

Journey of Silver Medalist – PGP 2018-20 batch

After numerous interviews (alongside rejections), I was quite relieved to be selected at IIM Kashipur. It was a shock when the first words I heard from the professor was, ‘ Your journey and hard work has just started’ and it is indeed true. Induction and trimester 1 are very important to acclimatize oneself with the rigors of an MBA program. The beauty of MBA at IIM Kashipur is that there is not one way to be successful, people can target particular skill sets or competencies through academics or through various PORs of clubs/committees. I have seen friends get upset at not being selected at any clubs/committees initially, but without these extra responsibilities it gives one time to work more on Academics or relax a hectic day with leisure like sports, music, etc. (which IIM Kashipur has excellent facilities). The only important thing here is to identify why one was not selected in the first place , what improvements need to be done to overcome that drawback and hone skill sets accordingly.

Peer learning is one of the best ways to learn at an MBA. I was very lucky to have close friends with complementary skill sets and knowledge and thus enhanced my knowledge manifold. Whatever I achieved at IIM Kashipur a lot of credit goes to my friends for supporting me in dire situations. Building a good network and close friends made life at IIM Kashipur the most enjoyable two years of my life.

I strongly believe that getting too much pressurized by the rigors of MBA does one no good. It is important to enjoy your MBA life and relax yourself from time to time to re-energize yourself. Sometimes coping with all the academic pressure may not a one day process. One can try to cope with the pressure with time, set small targets (for example, if you cannot follow all the courses in a trimester properly at once, initially target two to three courses that you are interested in and faithfully follow everything related to course like case studies, assignments, etc.)

Managing time to accommodate academics, other roles and responsibilities and most importantly time for your leisure is essential. Setting realistic weekly goals and daily sub-goals and adjusting the next day to complete any unfinished task ensures one does not get too much work to complete in one day. Proper planning every day (if possible, planning for every four-five hours) and avoiding procrastination is a good habit to enjoy your MBA life. I will end with a famous Bo Bennett quote – ‘ When it comes to success, there are no shortcuts’.

About the Author

Jyotirmoy Ray is alumnus of IIM Kashipur. He is the silver medalist of PGP Batch 2018-20. He is currently working as Consultant (FS Risk) at EY. He is also a  June 2021 Level 2 candidate in the CFA program and looking for opportunities in Valuation, Risk and Equity Research in Finance. He is also a Member of Indian Youth Delegation Program to Kyrgyzstan in 2019 under the initiative of Youth Affairs and Sports, Government of India.

You can connect with him on LinkedIn

( We thank the Alumni Relations Committee of IIM Kashipur for serving as a bridge to beget  valuable insights about the journey of becoming a gold medalist from our erudite alumnus. )

Journey of Gold Medalist – PGP 2018-20 batch

My journey with IIM Kashipur started much earlier when I appeared for the CAP (Common Admission Process) Interview on Feb 14, 2018, and the panelists were Prof. Patra and Prof. Batra, it was a very interesting discussion ranging from Climate Change Policies to estimating the number of 4-Wheelers sold per year in Delhi NCR. Obviously, back then I did not know they were from IIM Kashipur, but in the first term itself, I got to learn subjects on Statistics & Entrepreneurship from them respectively, which was a delight!

I personally believe, before starting our MBA journey, we must jot down some pointers as our goals, which we want to achieve before the course ends. These goals can be different for different students, depending upon our needs and the bigger picture, which we are stitching for our professional careers. 

For instance, from Day-1 my goals (plans) were to enhance my presentation skills (by taking lead in Group Projects while Presenting), networking skills (by joining ARC), and learning consulting mindset (by going beyond the scope of group projects & participating in case study competitions). I was also very clear with my priorities, top being the academic, then ARC & Prep-Cell responsibilities, and then case study competitions. Again, these priorities can be different for different students.

In my engineering, we had the options to select our Majors, and mine were Mechanical Design & Operations. And, since I was familiar with Operations Concepts, I preferred to choose Strategy, Marketing as my Majors and HR as minor. As I believed, these involved more of case-studies and classroom-based discussions, which is difficult for me to learn on my own. Finance & IT-Analytics, I decided to learn by my own, which I am continuing even today (Currently focusing on M&A Synergies). Learning should never stop!

About the Author

Vishvendra Singh Tomar is alumnus of IIM Kashipur. He is the gold medalist of PGP Batch 2018-20. He is currently working at the COO’s Office, L&T Technology Services Limited in the field of Corporate Strategy & Business Operations (Program Management). He  is a seasoned professional with an excellent proven track record on both professional as well as academic fronts. He has around 4 years of work experience, ranging from Product Analyst to Consultant during his association with PepsiCo (GVIC), Samsung Engineering, Dictiondock and L&T Technology Services (in chronological order).

You can connect with him on LinkedIn

( We thank the Alumni Relations Committee of IIM Kashipur for serving as a bridge to beget  valuable insights about the journey of becoming a gold medalist from our erudite alumnus. )

Beyond the Statement: Diversity & Inclusion

“We must not only learn to tolerate our differences. We must welcome them as the richness and diversity which can lead to true intelligence.”

–Albert Einstein

Embracing, including and respecting are the three things that almost every individual expects and deserves in life. The Oxford Dictionary defines diversity as “having a great deal of variety”. Looking further, we find diversity in various contexts—politics, ethnicity, nature, language, gender, race, skin colour, physical and mental challenges, etc. I believe diversity means accepting and respecting each other’s differences.

June is considered to be the pride month every year, commemorating the Stonewall Uprising of 1969. This year marks the 52nd anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising, widely considered to be the start of the modern LGBTQ+ rights movement in the U.S. The month marks the celebration of love, acceptance and being proud of who we are. Acceptance of diversity and spreading awareness about inclusion is a year-long, life-long activity and cannot be encapsulated within only one month, but still almost whole of the world celebrates this month to show their support for each other and to shower the support for eliminating the discrimination shown to the sexual minorities. We need people to question stereotypes and prejudices and go beyond the thought of discrimination to attain inclusivity in the sphere rhetorically.

India is still a developing country, but it has achieved wonders in embracing diversity technically. The path-breaking amendment to article 377, on September 6th, 2018,  decriminalizing homosexuality has created a benchmark in our country. After the partial quashing of the article, many organizations have planned and implemented diversity and inclusion in practice. Like, special drive to recruit LGBTQ+ people, medical leaves for sex reconstruction surgery, giving paternity/maternity leave benefits for the adoption of children and insurance benefits to partners are some of the many initiatives taken up. 

IIM Kashipur is trying to catch up with the developments and trying to adapt to the social and legal changes. It has set the benchmark to be one of the pioneer institutes for introducing the Diversity and Inclusion Club, which aims to embrace the diversity and inclusion of gender, sexual orientation, and physical disabilities. Besides, the club aspires to build a society represented by a community of informed, empowered and committed individuals who would be aware to acknowledge the diversity of any kind. In the two-year programme of MBA, to render the best of the knowledge and extensive social, legal and academic understanding, IIM Kashipur has also introduced the ‘Diversity and Inclusion’(D&I) course as a prime subject. Apart from the D&I course, courses like Organizational Behaviour focusses on how our society needs improvement in terms of practical embracement of diversity, it is done by sharing real-life stories, videos of talk shows by LGBTQ+ speakers and guest lectures from the industry. IIM Kashipur also focused on D&I as the theme of the TEDx Talk in the year 2019, where various speakers across the country joined to share their thoughts and experiences. IIM Kashipur has always thrived on offering inclusivity. With the help of our students and the Diversity and Inclusion Club, we will join hands to offer support to many oppressed individuals still seeking their rights to choose their sexuality.

Changes don’t turn out to be magical in just a single day or a single month. It is about showing up for the community every day – all year round!

About the Author:
Dr. Devjani Chatterjee is currently the Chairperson, Student Affairs at IIM Kashipur. She holds a PHD in the Organizational Behavior area from Industrial and Management Engineering Department of IIT Kanpur and is Assistant Professor, Organizational Behavior & Human Resource at IIM Kashipur. Dr. Chatterjee has many international journal publications, books and book chapters to credit and also presented papers in reputed national and international conferences across the world. She worked as a faculty in the OB area in IMI Kolkata before joining IIM Kashipur. She serves as a reviewer of many international journals of reputed publication houses and is also the Editor of the journal “Journal of Open Innovation Technology, Market & Complexity”, a Springer publication. She held many administrative posts like Library Chairperson, Research Committee Member, Seminar Co-ordinator, FM Convenor, HR Club Mentor and others at IMI Kolkata. She is the vice president of the prestigious Society of Open Innovation Technology, Market & Complexity.

Deadlines are sacrosanct

 ” Deadlines are Sacrosanct “The three magical words every Bschool graduate gets to hear very often. The phrase has been used many times by all, however, its importance, it seems, is yet to be known to many. The only sacrosanct rule at all IIMs is punctuality.

Good Management is only appreciated in its absence. So, while waiting for my food order in a queue made me realize how unaccustomed I have become to queues, waiting, and things not happening as they are supposed to. This further made me admire the beauty of time and how efficiently things happen in IIM Kashipur.

 I remember my first week of induction which was by far the busiest and most rewarding schedule as I was given a rehearsal for the life waiting ahead for me. I was reassured over and over that we will sail through it and no one has ever died of insomnia. For a moment 24 hours felt quite less seeing the ocean of things lined up -course work, assignments, enrolments, orientation sessions, alumni meet, student body meets, senior interactions, batch meets round the clock and then you have sacrosanct deadlines for them.

 If you want to know the value of one minute, ask the person who missed their deadline by a minute and has been awarded one grade lower than what they would have received if they had submitted the assignment on time.

 All this is done not to scare anyone nor does any faculty enjoy doing so, it is done to make us part of an erudite culture that values time above all commitments. As every management institute does, the IIM Kashipur framework serves as a paradigm of effective management. All tasks are done from a “better never than late” mentality, based on the central principle of punctuality. 

 The obligation of punctuality extends not only to students but also to both faculty and staff. No one is permitted to waste someone else’s time, resulting in a super-efficient system.When you have grown used to such a culture indoctrinated for the system to function smoothly, even a 15-minute line seems weird.

So my only tip is value and plan things ahead of time and keep an action plan ready for last moment hiccups. My go strategy for the same was to simply set all my clocks ahead by 15 minutes (and then forget about it).

About the Author:
Sakshi Poddar a Computer Science Engineer by qualification is now pursuing MBA (Analytics) from IIM Kashipur. She is a part of various student bodies like the Media and Public Relations Committee and Admission Support Body. She is an IT professional with 2 years of experience in Hewlett Packard Enterprise. She loves traveling and dancing. You can connect with her on LinkedIn

Why Women Are the X-Factor in the New Working Environment

New ways of working and leading are desired in today’s business environment.  In order to succeed in that system, organizations will need two fundamental sets of skills. The first being digital skills for which many organizations are actively hiring software developers, data scientists and analysts, experienced designers, and people with critical digital skills. The second skill set, however—is just as important: human-centred skills in areas such as communication, collaboration, motivation, emotional intelligence, creativity, and imagination.

The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, its economic disruption and uncertainty, has only underscored the need for these skills. Over the next decade, these leadership skills will become must-haves as traditional, top-down approaches decline in the face of fast, highly collaborative, agile organizations. Nonetheless, today’s leaders will have to navigate uncertainty and comprehend the needs and challenges of various stakeholders in the ever-changing scenarios. Leaders must be empathetic and able to encourage others, inspire teams, develop relationships, and learn with humility, in a business world with increasingly differentiated, multi-functional teams that operate independently.

A NEW LEADERSHIP MODEL

While algorithms can perform standardised processes and make straightforward decisions much faster, cheaper, and more accurately than humans, other skills – which only humans can leverage, such as empathy, imagination, and judgment—are essential for complex problem-solving.

That’s why, in today’s agile organisations, leaders don’t just issue orders based on their own expertise or experience instead, they identify a problem and then support autonomous teams that do the actual work of solving that problem. Such leadership necessitates a level of vulnerability, such as someone who encourages and supports people who have better knowledge about a given subject than their superiors and are more likely to find a solution. 

Then, the question arises – How can women leaders contribute to this change? Something that many people already know – women tend to be highly empathetic, with strong emotional intelligence, active listeners who solicit ideas, collaborate, share credit, and change course when necessary. It has also been observed that when there are more women on a team, the collective intelligence of the groups tend to increase. Moreover, gender-balanced teams are how diverse leadership teams boost innovation than their competitors, and perform better. While empathy and relationship-building skills appear to be uncommon among leadership candidates, most organisations will find them in their own untapped pools of women employees and managers.

GROWING EVIDENCE OF WOMEN’S ABILITY TO LEAD IN THE NEW WAYS

Empirical evidence suggests that many of the essential leadership qualities are more likely to be displayed by women.  For example, a recent study published in Harvard Business Review found that women in leadership roles were ranked higher than men in a variety of key competencies, such as encouraging and motivating others, building partnerships, cooperation, and teamwork.

When looking at more granular skills, researchers from a German university discovered that women, in general, can accurately decipher emotions from people’s faces. Another research discovered that women are better at reading body language than men. According to a third study, men detect subtle signs of emotion like depression just around 40% of the time, while women can notice them 90% of the time. Furthermore, a study published in the journal Science found that having more women on a team improved the collective knowledge of the groups. Rather than attempting to dominate a conversation or a task, women are more likely to consider others, elicit feedback, listen actively, and take turns contributing. As a result, women-centric organizations have become more collaborative and better able to tap into the potential.

For organizations that understand the need to work and lead in new ways, and the imperative of diversity, the message is clear: workplaces need to identify people with these skills and put them in leadership roles. That was true even before COVID-19, but the pandemic has emphasised the relevance of empathetic, collaborative leadership. Companies that wish to reap the benefits of these leadership skills must increase their efforts to recruit, retain, and encourage women.

About the Author:

Payal Singh, a Production Engineer by qualification is currently pursuing MBA (Analytics) from IIM Kashipur.  She is a part of  Team Insite- Admission Support Body at the prestigious institution. You can connect with her on Linkedin.